Causes and Symptoms of Resorptive Lesions in Cats

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Feline resorptive lesions or tooth resorption is a discomforting oral condition in which dentin, a hard bony structure of the cat’s tooth erodes and gradually gets damaged beyond repair. Dentin is present a little deeper underneath the tooth enamel. Sometimes, this condition may affect the dentin in multiple teeth simultaneously. If it goes without treatment, the entire tooth, along with its root may become affected.

Causes of Resorptive lesions in Cats

Tooth resorption in cats is still under research and there may be many reasons that point to the problem, but are not conclusive. Some theories indicate that the presence of certain compounds in commercial food may be the cause of resorptive lesions. It is known to affect almost 60% of cats aged mostly five years and above.

what causes resorptive lesions in cats

The degree of resorption and damage may vary in different cases. In certain cases, the cat may lose only one tooth in its entire life. There may still be a mild resorption on some roots, but it may not require medical intervention and the cat may stay away from eating for one day. If there are multiple resorptive lesions, the cat avoids chewing the food and swallows it down. The cat tends to completely stop eating, when the condition becomes too extreme.

Signs of Resorptive lesions in Cats

  • Increased salivation
  • Bleeding from the teeth
  • Spasms of the jaw, when the affected tooth is touched
  • Difficulty in eating. The cat may prefer to eat only from one side and tilts its head to bite the food.
  • The cat tries to swallow the food without biting and it may keep falling off its mouth.
  • Prefers to eat only soft foods
  • The cat tries to bite down on the tooth that is hurting.

If you suspect your cat may be suffering from tooth resorption, you should take it to the vet for an oral examination. Your vet will be able to confirm it with the help of an oral X-ray.

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